missy: August 2009 Archives

Dear Missy,

Do you have a recipe to take the place of Alfredo sauce? 
Thanks for all you do to help all mothers. Lisa

Dear Lisa,

You are so welcome : )

Below please find my recipe for Healthy Fettuccine Alfredo. It's from my second book for Men.

Enjoy in good health : )

Missy

Fettuccine Don’t Be Afraid-O

Healthy fettuccine Alfredo? Tackling this oxymoron was the ultimate challenge for The Sneaky Chef. Normally loaded with heavy cream, butter, and cheese, it’s jokingly referred to as “heart attack on a plate.” But with the help of evaporated skim milk and tofu, two of my favorite accomplices, I was able to retain the creamy texture of the original sauce—and a little Parmesan cheese and turkey bacon (or prosciutto) provide the authentic Alfredo flavor!

Makes 4 servings
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon unbleached white flour
2 cups evaporated skim milk
1⁄2 cup (1⁄4 of a 14-ounce block) firm tofu, mashed well or pureed in a food processor
1⁄2 cup grated Parmesan or Romano cheese
1 pound fettuccine, ideally whole wheat, cooked according to package directions 
2 tablespoons diced prosciutto or turkey bacon bits, for garnish (optional) 
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Sprinkle the flour over the oil and stir constantly with a wooden spoon for about 1 minute (this is a roux, a fancy name for a thickener). Whisk in the evaporated milk, tofu, and cheese. Reduce the heat to simmer and cook for about 5 minutes, whisking constantly, until the sauce has thickened.

Put the hot fettuccine into a large serving bowl and pour on the sauce, tossing well to coat the pasta evenly. Garnish with the prosciutto or bacon, if using, and season with salt and freshly ground pepper. Serve immediately.

Sneaky Tip: Prosciutto has all of bacon’s flavor, but less of its fat.

Hello!

I just made your Unbelievable Chocolate-Chip cookies and thought I had the nutritional info but must have been mistaken.  My son loves them but is Diabetic and we must count carbohydrates. Do you have the information anywhere on the website that I missed? Is it possible to get the info otherwise? We love your recipes.

I wrote to you right after Frankie was diagnosed and home from the hospital last October.  Your quick and sincere reply really stuck with me.  It was very helpful!  Thank you so much. 

Frankie just turned 2 and loves your recipes. I have only just started cooking real foods again.  It's been a tough 10 months. I haven't met anyone yet who dislikes this recipe, thanks!  Actually, we can't stop eating them! 

Sincerely,
Deanna

Dear Deanna,

I'm so glad that things are going better for you and Frankie. I remember when you first learned about his juvenile diabetes last October and you definitely didn't sound as good as you do now. I know it can't be easy, and I'm relieved that things are going better. That I could have been a source of support for you, in however small a measure, makes me feel like a better person today. Thank you : )

Here is the nutritional analysis for Unbelievable Chocolate Chip Cookies from Book 3, To the Rescue. I now make sure that every recipe in my books has nutritional analysis based on feedback from readers like you.

Keep up the faith, and the great work,

Missy


UNBELIEVABLE CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES 

Per Serving (1 cookie, 21g): Calories 46; Total Fat 2.6g; Fiber 0.5g; Total Carbohydrates 5.6g; Sugars 3.0g; Protein 0.8g; Sodium 37mg; Cholesterol 9mg. 11% less calories, 10% less fat, 11% less carbs, 55% more fiber, 48% more potassium, 20% less sodium, 26% more protein, and 25% less sugars than traditional recipe.

 

Egg Replacer in Recipes

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Hi Missy, how would you go about using an egg substitute in your recipes? My child is gluten and dairy free. It would be greatly

appreciated, Thanks, Minndy

Hi Minndy,

Easy: the product is called "Egg Replacer" by Ener-G Foods Inc.

It's available in all health food stores in the baking section, as well as in many regular supermarkets.  It comes in a box, like a cake mix, and you use something like one tablespoon with a little water per egg.  Directions are on the box.  Works great.

There are actually a number of egg replacers that work very well depending on what you're cooking.  Tofu, for example, works very well where a lot of eggs are involved, like in quiches, or even tofu omlettes! 

Flax seeds also work, as well as various vegetable oils.  I suggest you do a quick Google search on "Egg Replacers" and you'll find recipes for exactly what you're doing.  In the meantime, here are some others that work:

2 tbsp corn starch = 1 egg
2 tbsp arrowroot flour = 1 egg
2 tbsp potato starch = 1 egg
1 heaping tbsp soy powder + 2 tbsp water = 1 egg
1 tbsp soy milk powder + 1 tbsp cornstarch + 2 tbsp water = 1 egg.
1 banana = 1 egg in cakes.

 

Vita-Mix

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Hi Missy,
 
I love your books and use them frequently. I was wondering if the
make ahead recipes/purees can be made in a blender instead of a food
processor. My high-speed blender (Vita-mix) is infinitely easier to
use and quicker to clean up than my food processor, (and leaves
absolutely NO telltale lumps - guaranteed!), so I'd rather use my
blender if I can. But if I do the make ahead recipes in the blender
instead of the food processor, I'm not sure if the consistency will
come out right or be too runny. What are your thoughts?

Thanks!
Michele

Dear Michele,
 
You certainly can use a VitaMix. That machine is awesome. There will be only some practical considerations, like the larger size of the jar. I prefer a 3-cup mini processor because I need to add very little water and all of the puree is concentrated together. In a larger jar, you may find that it is spread out on the bottom more and requires more coaxing to get it evenly mixed, etc. Otherwise, the VitaMix really doubles as a processor as well.  

Keep up the great work!

Missy

 

Hi Missy,  

I was wondering about pasteurization-have you ever tried recipes with veggies w/o cooking, just puree rather than cooking or using pasteurized baby food?  Just a thought...

Lil

Hi again Lillian : )

I always incorporate fresh, raw vegetables whenever possible in order to maintain maximum nutritional content, like raw zucchini in the white puree, and raw baby spinach in the green puree. Interestingly, some vegetables are actually easier for the body to absorb when cooked, like broccoli, as heat breaks down tough cell walls, making their contents more accessible for digestion. 

I also have many recipes for fresh juices. Here are a few from my first book : )

Enjoy in good health!

Missy
 

Make-Ahead Recipe #6: Blueberry Juice

2  1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries (no syrup or sugar added)
2 cups water
1 tablespoon sugar

Bring berries, water and sugar to boil in a medium pot. Turn heat to low and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Occasionally mash the blueberries with the back of a spoon to release their juices. Pour into a fine mesh strainer over a container or bowl, pressing the blueberry “ pulp” with the back of a spoon until all the liquid is released. 

Store in refrigerator up to 3 days, or freeze 1/4 cup portions in sealed plastic bags or small plastic containers. Makes 2 cups of Blueberry Juice. Double this recipe if you want to store more juice. This recipe also yields about 3/4 cup pulp leftover in the strainer. Save this pulp to add to Purple Puree.

Blueberry Juice is used in the following recipes:
Quick Fixes for Jell-O
Jiggly Gelatin Blocks
Royal Ice Pops
Blue Ribbon Shake
Lavender Icing
Frozen Applesauce
Blueberry Milk
Quick Fixes for Store-Bought Lemonade
Quick Fixes for Applesauce
Homemade Berry Syrup
Say Yes to Sorbet
Quick Fixes for Sparkling Water
Quick Fixes for Oatmeal

Blueberry Juice Blueberries’ purple color indicates they are rich in anthocyanins and ellagic acid — powerful cancer fighters and brain boosters. Blueberry Juice also offers anti-bacterial activity that can combat intestinal infections due to E.Coli, and are an effective treatment for cystitis. 

Make-Ahead Recipe #7: Cherry Juice
2  1/2 cups fresh or frozen pitted cherries (no syrup or sugar added)
2 cups water
1 tablespoon sugar

Bring cherries, water, and sugar to boil in a medium pot. Turn heat to low and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Occasionally mash the cherries with the back of a spoon (or a potato masher) to release their juices. Pour into a fine mesh strainer over a container or bowl, pressing the cherry “pulp” with the back of a spoon until all the liquid is released. 

Store in refrigerator up to 3 days, or freeze 1/4  cup portions in sealed plastic bags or small plastic containers. Makes 2 cups of Cherry Juice. Double this recipe if you want to store more juice. This recipe also yields about 3/4 cup pulp leftover in the strainer. Save this pulp to add to smoothies.

Cherry Juice is used in the following recipes:
Frozen Applesauce
Chocolate Milk
Cheery Hot Cocoa
Quick Fixes for Store-Bought Lemonade
Quick Fixes for Jell-O®
Royal Ice Pops
Say Yes to Sorbet
Quick Fixes for Sparkling Water
Quick Fixes for Oatmeal

Cherry Juice is referred to by some nutritionists as the “ healing fruit,” cherries are rich in vitamins A, C, potassium, fiber and antioxidants. Like blueberries, cherries are a potent source of ellagic acid — a flavonoid that has been found to be one of the most potent anti-cancer agents. Studies have shown that cherries, especially the tart ones, can help educe inflammation in the body and therefore can help eliminate migraine headaches— similar to aspirin or ibuprofen. They are also rich in the naturally-occurring hormone, melatonin, which has been found to slow aging and enhance sleep. And to top it off, researchers report that cherries can slow the spoilage of ground beef and reduce the formation of potentially harmful compounds in meat during cooking. 

Try to use organic frozen or fresh cherries and strawberries, since both of these fruits top the list of the “dirty dozen” or most contaminated produce with pesticide residues. 

Make-Ahead Recipe #8: Strawberry Juice
2  1/2 cups fresh or frozen strawberries (no syrup or sugar added)
2 cups water
1 tablespoon sugar

Bring berries, water and sugar to boil in a medium pot. Turn heat to low and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Occasionally mash the strawberries with the back of a spoon to release their juices. Pour into a fine mesh strainer over a container or bowl, pressing the strawberry “ pulp” with the back of a spoon until all the liquid is released. 

Store in refrigerator up to 3 days, or freeze  1/4 cup portions in sealed plastic bags or small plastic containers. Makes 2 cups of Strawberry Juice. Double this recipe if you want to store more juice. This recipe also yields about 3/4 cup pulp leftover in the strainer. Save this pulp to add to smoothies.

Strawberry Juice is used in the following recipes:
Frozen Applesauce
Strawberry Milk
Quick Fixes for Store-Bought Lemonade
Quick Fixes for Jell-O®
Royal Ice Pops
Homemade Berry Syrup
Say Yes to Sorbet
Quick Fixes for Sparkling Water
Quick Fixes for Oatmeal

Strawberry Juice Strawberries’ dark red color means great health benefits from the potent antioxidants and rich supply of vitamins. Just eight strawberries provide 140 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C for children, and they are also a good source of folic acid, fiber, potassium, and disease-fighting phytochemicals. Strawberry Juice offers a concentrated dose of these immune-boosting nutrients. 
 

 

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