Fresh Juice & Fresh Veggie Recipes

| | Comments (0) | TrackBacks (0)

Hi Missy,  

I was wondering about pasteurization-have you ever tried recipes with veggies w/o cooking, just puree rather than cooking or using pasteurized baby food?  Just a thought...

Lil

Hi again Lillian : )

I always incorporate fresh, raw vegetables whenever possible in order to maintain maximum nutritional content, like raw zucchini in the white puree, and raw baby spinach in the green puree. Interestingly, some vegetables are actually easier for the body to absorb when cooked, like broccoli, as heat breaks down tough cell walls, making their contents more accessible for digestion. 

I also have many recipes for fresh juices. Here are a few from my first book : )

Enjoy in good health!

Missy
 

Make-Ahead Recipe #6: Blueberry Juice

2  1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries (no syrup or sugar added)
2 cups water
1 tablespoon sugar

Bring berries, water and sugar to boil in a medium pot. Turn heat to low and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Occasionally mash the blueberries with the back of a spoon to release their juices. Pour into a fine mesh strainer over a container or bowl, pressing the blueberry “ pulp” with the back of a spoon until all the liquid is released. 

Store in refrigerator up to 3 days, or freeze 1/4 cup portions in sealed plastic bags or small plastic containers. Makes 2 cups of Blueberry Juice. Double this recipe if you want to store more juice. This recipe also yields about 3/4 cup pulp leftover in the strainer. Save this pulp to add to Purple Puree.

Blueberry Juice is used in the following recipes:
Quick Fixes for Jell-O
Jiggly Gelatin Blocks
Royal Ice Pops
Blue Ribbon Shake
Lavender Icing
Frozen Applesauce
Blueberry Milk
Quick Fixes for Store-Bought Lemonade
Quick Fixes for Applesauce
Homemade Berry Syrup
Say Yes to Sorbet
Quick Fixes for Sparkling Water
Quick Fixes for Oatmeal

Blueberry Juice Blueberries’ purple color indicates they are rich in anthocyanins and ellagic acid — powerful cancer fighters and brain boosters. Blueberry Juice also offers anti-bacterial activity that can combat intestinal infections due to E.Coli, and are an effective treatment for cystitis. 

Make-Ahead Recipe #7: Cherry Juice
2  1/2 cups fresh or frozen pitted cherries (no syrup or sugar added)
2 cups water
1 tablespoon sugar

Bring cherries, water, and sugar to boil in a medium pot. Turn heat to low and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Occasionally mash the cherries with the back of a spoon (or a potato masher) to release their juices. Pour into a fine mesh strainer over a container or bowl, pressing the cherry “pulp” with the back of a spoon until all the liquid is released. 

Store in refrigerator up to 3 days, or freeze 1/4  cup portions in sealed plastic bags or small plastic containers. Makes 2 cups of Cherry Juice. Double this recipe if you want to store more juice. This recipe also yields about 3/4 cup pulp leftover in the strainer. Save this pulp to add to smoothies.

Cherry Juice is used in the following recipes:
Frozen Applesauce
Chocolate Milk
Cheery Hot Cocoa
Quick Fixes for Store-Bought Lemonade
Quick Fixes for Jell-O®
Royal Ice Pops
Say Yes to Sorbet
Quick Fixes for Sparkling Water
Quick Fixes for Oatmeal

Cherry Juice is referred to by some nutritionists as the “ healing fruit,” cherries are rich in vitamins A, C, potassium, fiber and antioxidants. Like blueberries, cherries are a potent source of ellagic acid — a flavonoid that has been found to be one of the most potent anti-cancer agents. Studies have shown that cherries, especially the tart ones, can help educe inflammation in the body and therefore can help eliminate migraine headaches— similar to aspirin or ibuprofen. They are also rich in the naturally-occurring hormone, melatonin, which has been found to slow aging and enhance sleep. And to top it off, researchers report that cherries can slow the spoilage of ground beef and reduce the formation of potentially harmful compounds in meat during cooking. 

Try to use organic frozen or fresh cherries and strawberries, since both of these fruits top the list of the “dirty dozen” or most contaminated produce with pesticide residues. 

Make-Ahead Recipe #8: Strawberry Juice
2  1/2 cups fresh or frozen strawberries (no syrup or sugar added)
2 cups water
1 tablespoon sugar

Bring berries, water and sugar to boil in a medium pot. Turn heat to low and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Occasionally mash the strawberries with the back of a spoon to release their juices. Pour into a fine mesh strainer over a container or bowl, pressing the strawberry “ pulp” with the back of a spoon until all the liquid is released. 

Store in refrigerator up to 3 days, or freeze  1/4 cup portions in sealed plastic bags or small plastic containers. Makes 2 cups of Strawberry Juice. Double this recipe if you want to store more juice. This recipe also yields about 3/4 cup pulp leftover in the strainer. Save this pulp to add to smoothies.

Strawberry Juice is used in the following recipes:
Frozen Applesauce
Strawberry Milk
Quick Fixes for Store-Bought Lemonade
Quick Fixes for Jell-O®
Royal Ice Pops
Homemade Berry Syrup
Say Yes to Sorbet
Quick Fixes for Sparkling Water
Quick Fixes for Oatmeal

Strawberry Juice Strawberries’ dark red color means great health benefits from the potent antioxidants and rich supply of vitamins. Just eight strawberries provide 140 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C for children, and they are also a good source of folic acid, fiber, potassium, and disease-fighting phytochemicals. Strawberry Juice offers a concentrated dose of these immune-boosting nutrients. 
 

 

0 TrackBacks

Listed below are links to blogs that reference this entry: Fresh Juice & Fresh Veggie Recipes.

TrackBack URL for this entry: http://www.thesneakychef.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-tb.cgi/300

Leave a comment

Quick Links

Links

Archives

The Sneaky Chef is available at fine booksellers everywhere: